Twitter moving to 280 characters in tweets from 140.

Twitter announced on their blog last night that they will be expanding the character limit in tweets from 140 to 280 to random accounts, but will be a test for all Twitter users in the near future.

According to Twitter product manager, Aliza Rosen, “We want every person around the world to easily express themselves on Twitter, so we’re doing something new: we’re going to try out a longer limit, 280 characters, in languages impacted by cramming (which is all except Japanese, Chinese, and Korean). Although this is only available to a small group right now, we want to be transparent about why we are excited to try this.”

aliza rosen twitter announcement

Jack Dorsey, Twitter CEO, also made the brief announcement from his personal Twitter account yesterday which was met with both positive and negative feedback.

twitter going to 280 charaters

Still, Twitter pointed to people who post primarily in Japanese, Chinese and Korean, languages with alphabets that allow the expression of more thoughts in fewer characters. Those users tend to bump up against the character limits less often, which Twitter said leads to more frequent messages.

As a result, Twitter said, if rules around characters are loosened, English-speaking users — who tend to use more characters in tweets — will also hit character limits less frequently. That may, in turn, lead English-speaking users to post more regularly.

The test will begin in small groups around the world. The company has not said whether it will roll the change out to all users in the future.

Twitter said the people who will get to test the 280-character tweets will be randomly selected. Whether that may include prominent Twitter users like President Trump is unclear.

Although we tend to believe that much of this is stemming from flat growth and new user acquisition, and also pressure from shareholders to update a stale platform, we personally welcome the change and are interested in seeing how tweets and people will react to the change and update. It will certainly provide us with a lot more data from a social listening perspective for our client base.

Author: Eric Graham, Digital Marketing Manager

 

How to launch a sucessful organic social media campaign

There are days where we spend time on Quora.com. It’s an opportunity to knowledge share amongst peers and helpful towards our own SEO efforts. But also, a great place to see and learn what others in similar industries are doing as well. Today we came across the following question: What does a company have to do to successfully launch and grow a social media platform?

There are different strategies for different platforms. One of our golden rules in content strategy is to never just post text without some form of engagement such as Call-To-Action (CTA) type posts, imagery, humor, contests, Gifs, video, etc.

using calls to action in social media

Here are summaries of organic strategy for the well-known platforms to get an organization stared:

Twitter can be B2B and B2C. Twitter is a great platform to post blogs, videos, gifs, contests, CTA’s, infographics, etc. The ‘norm’ for frequency of posts should be 4 times a day allowing a few hours in between posts. Hashtags are also important. We usually suggest a minimum of two hashtags per post, but don’t overkill it (That’s for Instagram). Hashtags should be industry focused and branded.


Twitter character limit

Facebook can be mostly B2C. It’s an opportunity to attract your audience with CTA posts such as “Caption This” (with an image), videos, infographics, etc. The ‘norm’ for frequency of posts should be no less than two times a day with at least 3–4 hours in between posts. Hashtags aren’t necessary on Facebook.

Instagram caters to a younger crowd and this is where you can unload the bucketful of hashtags. We have seen up to 15 hashtags per post and not lose engagement. Of course, every post doesn’t have to have a minimum of 15. Hashtag strategy should be like Twitter; generic and branded. The ‘norm’ for frequency of posts should be like Facebook. One post per day is acceptable, but keep consistency.

how to use instagram

LinkedIn is a B2B platform. This is a more information-based platform and there needs to be an element of professionalism. Many are using it to post content which is not applicable to the platform’s core competency. Frequency of posts should be somewhat like Facebook or Instagram (two times a day with several hours in between). Content should be blog, infographics and information-based. No contests, CTA’s, gifs, etc. Humor is alright if it’s applicable to the subject matter. Many use Twitter to post their LinkedIn blogs / publications.

There are other platforms such as Pinterest, SnapChat, Sina Weibo, Google Plus, etc. But, an organization needs to know their audience and where their audience spends the most time. Once an entity has done this, the content strategy for each platform can begin.

We have listed several organic ways to increase a Follower or Page Like count. There are paid pushes, sponsored campaigns and while we don’t necessarily condone the purchasing of followers, in some industries. Everything can be effective if done correctly.

We realize we didn’t give all the answers for every business. It will be hard to be in every place all the time for each business. The best course of action is always to determine your goals, and what you hope to accomplish from social media. From those goals, you can then determine at least the first two platforms that make the most sense for your business and focus your attention in those places. If you can master one or both strategies; educate and/or entertain, nearly any business can succeed on social media.

If you have any questions about social media, Quora, or anything else, do not hesitate to contact us via our social channels, email us at info@iwesocial.com or call us at 720.880.5492

Who’s leading the Internet of Things (IoT) Marketing Battle?

Internet of Things (IoT) Marketing Battle

Introduction to IBM and Microsoft IoT

Social media marketing is more of a subtle art than an exact science and big brands often make the mistake of comparing it with traditional marketing. You cannot have an “if you build it they will come” approach. We see this with comparing the effectiveness of two giants, IBM and Microsoft in the IoT space. Although just a three-month sample, looking at marketing activities between these two IoT market leaders, we see a winner. There is a clear distinction between how IBM and Microsoft promote their IoT products and services to the market.

The Analysis

In a recent Forrester Wave report looking at the top IoT software platforms (published November 2016), both IBM and Microsoft were identified as leaders. This analysis looked at these two market leaders to understand how effective their marketing efforts have been in this space. Specifically, social listening and analytics tactics were used to assess Q1 2017 (Jan., Feb., and Mar.) performance of these two IoT vendors, to understand:

  • Share of Voice and social media reach
  • Overall marketing effectiveness (what worked)
    • Top Post comparison
    • Top Media comparison
    • Top Author comparison
  • Influencer marketing and engagement strategy

free iot report

Followers and Page Likes Comparison

When comparing IBM and Microsoft’s IoT social presence, IBM has the edge with 6,628 Facebook Page Likes and 68.2K Twitter Followers, compared to Microsoft’s 2,289 Facebook Page Likes and 41.5K Twitter Followers.

ibm watson iot

 

Twitter was the highest conversation channel represented for both IBM and Microsoft in Q1 of 2017. There were over 134K posts that mentioned IBM IoT compared to over 54K posts mentioning Microsoft IoT. IBM significantly outperformed Microsoft with Engagements (12,205 compared to 275). There was a low conversation count identified for both brands on Facebook.

microsoft iot

 

Looking at a high-level social metrics view comparing IBM and Microsoft’s IoT efforts, IBM (71% share) significantly outperformed Microsoft (29% share). IBM saw a peak in conversation the week of February 13th with their announcement of the IBM Watson IoT Headquarters in Munich. IBM also realized a higher Passion Intensity index compared to Microsoft. Interestingly, Microsoft IoT conversation netted a higher negative tone compared to IBM.

ibm watson analytics

Looking at the Passion Intensity Index of these two brands, IBM IoT saw a very strong Brand Passion Index with a score of 96 compared to Microsoft IoT Passion Intensity Index of 75. Top emotions identified with IBM, include: Great, Excited, Proud, and Happy.

microsoft iot passion index

Looking at the top terms and hashtags used by each brand, “MicrosoftCorporation” was frequently used within the Microsoft IoT conversation. Whereas, “Watson” and “IBMInterconnect” were frequently used within the IBM IoT conversation. Terms like BigData, Cloud, and Security were used more with IBM compared to Microsoft. IBM also used “Recruiting” terms as part of their IoT conversation. Note: Use related industry terms and hashtags to increase the reach of your primary term.

iot wordcloud

A couple of key events drove IBM’s conversation for Q1, 2017. On February 15th, IBM announced the opening of their IBM Watson IoT Headquarters in Munich. IBM successfully leveraged several promotional materials for this announcement including a wonderful video highlighting the opening.

ibm iot

We see other excellent examples of IBM using video effectively in their IoT marketing efforts. On January 26th, IBM Japan posted a video that demonstrated Bluemix with Watson, Blockchain, and IoT technologies. This single video was viewed over 37K times and shared over 100 times.

ibm watson live video

 

We see IBM using video across multiple channels effectively as well. In the below Twitter post, IBM used video and an industry influencer to increase their IoT presence.

ibm watson security and iot

free iot report

Compare this to Microsoft’s IoT historical trend and top posts. Microsoft relied on traditional news outlets and social posting to promote their IoT brand. Although a steady conversation trend, nothing of significance to note from Microsoft’s IoT marketing efforts for the quarter.

microsoft social media iot

When comparing how IBM and Microsoft are leveraging key influencers, IBM again has a clear advantage. The top 3 influencers that engaged in the IBM IoT conversation had a combined Follower base of 280K+. This creates a great opportunity for IBM. Note: Marketers should “listen” and engage, promote, converse with key Influencers to further promote their own brand.

What is iot

We see another great example of influencer marketing from IBM on the below Facebook post where Rebecca Jarvis, Chief Business, Technology, & Economics Correspondent interviews IBM Watson at CES. This interview has been viewed over 13K times and shared over 175 times. This is a very strategic influencer outreach by IBM as Rebecca has over 200K Followers on Facebook.

Rebecca Jarvis, Chief Business, Technology, & Economics Correspondent interviews IBM Watson at CES.

Conclusion

Marketing professionals are beginning to realize that social interactions with online users with large followings can be tremendously beneficial. We see this with IBM’s IoT marketing efforts. IBM was very effective in leveraging key industry influencers to promote their IoT offering.

Influencer marketing has become top of mind for many marketing professionals. In a recent survey of 100 marketing professionals in the US, nearly a third (32 percent) consider influencer marketing an essential part of their strategy. Furthermore, 40 percent found more success by working with influential social media users than through traditional ad campaigns.

Along with influencer marketing, we found that IBM successfully created and promoted an assortment of compelling video content. Whether it’s video on Facebook, Twitter, Snapchat or Youtube, marketing professionals should be thinking about how best to incorporate video into their marketing mix. In a 2016 survey of over 5,000 marketers, a significant 60% of marketers use video in their marketing and 73% plan on increasing their use of video. The single most important strategy in content marketing today is video.

So, what did we learn? The question surrounding social media marketing today is not whether you are doing it, but rather how effective you are at doing it. Most of us marketers have moved beyond the traditional vanity metrics of a number of likes and shares (if you haven’t, you should), to analyzing what’s important with your marketing efforts. We see from this analysis that using social analytics tactics, we can identify key drivers of successful marketing campaigns. We can also understand where our own brand stacks up against our greatest rivals.

 

Author: Evan Escobedo, VP and GM iWeSocial, evan.escobedo@iwesocial.com

 

free iot report

 

The Elements of a viral video

How do you make a great video?

It’s no secret these days when it comes to creating engaging social media content for your business, or even your personal page, nearly nothing gets the response from people like videos do. But why is that? What makes a video go “viral”? Is there a recipe for virality? What key elements of videos make people love them? Dogs? Absolutely. Cats? 100%. Kids? Without question. Adults? Maybe but not as much. Destruction and chaos? In most cases, yes. Food and recipes? Oh, yeah. But why do people love video, but also love some videos even more so, and what makes good video content?

What makes good video content?

Some difficult questions to answer for sure. One of the main reasons so much video content is made from marketers, and everyday people, is that we remember video so much longer than other forms of content such as the written word. It’s so much easier and generally more entertaining to consumers as well. This article not withstanding of course. And according to an article by ARS Technica, we might have neurons in our brains that “light up” when we are exposed to certain types of content. What about cat videos?

Who doesn’t love cat videos?

Researcher Dr. Radha O’Meara from Massey University in New Zealand who poured over hundreds of hours of cat videos to find out a common theme or trigger: Because “cats don’t care they’re being filmed — an especially rare thing these days, particularly at a time that we ourselves are a bit unnerved about being watched. Cats don’t seem to acknowledge the camera at all and just do whatever they like, they are oblivious to it.”

But there is also the element that all of us have a deep seeded pleasure in surveillance and spying in other people’s lives.  This is essentially what spawned the evolution of so-called “Reality TV”. We like to think there is no script and no acting, so we can observe the life and flaws of another person. It makes us feel good knowing other people are as flawed or more so than we are. There’s comfort in other people’s flaws to some extent. But aren’t we all a little voyeuristic when it comes to people’s everyday lives? We all want to see behind the curtain from time to time. Does that also explain our seemingly insatiable appetite for food and recipe videos?

Recipes and Food shows aren’t just for TV

We all love food, we all secretly want to be chefs, and being a home chef is probably the closest most of us will get to being a chef. But how many recipe building and food videos are enough? Apparently, there aren’t enough as we can’t seem to get enough of them.

But why? In article published by Spoon University, nostalgia plays a big role. “Tapping into what has made cooking channels so well-liked, food videos make viewers feel all warm and fuzzy inside as they imagine themselves as a child devouring their favorite snack or now as an adult cooking food from the heart for their loved ones.” Plus, we don’t have to watch an hour-long show to get the recipe, but rather in 60 second increments and poof, Coq Au Vin! And the birth of yet another home chef has been fostered. But this trend of video watching must stop or slow down at some point, right? Isn’t it getting close to running its course? Maybe, but probably not. Is there a “Next Frontier” of video content? Oh, yes, and this time it’s live, not recorded.

 

Live video is the new video

Live video is the new frontier, and it satisfies nearly all our emotional cravings. A simple live video can satisfy our voyeuristic tendencies by letting us in on something happening now, and giving us at least a glimpse of what is happening behind the proverbial curtain. It provides that instant gratification we all so sorely demand from nearly everything. Live video also provides a sense of FOMO, or fear of missing out. But live events and videos also can replace our need to be somewhere faraway to see it and experience it in person. Can’t afford to attend or have the time to go to this year’s Coachella? Not to worry, tune in to the live feed and experience it from the comfort of your desk. With Live Video now, you can even interact with the content and creators. But is all this enough to make your video or live stream go “viral”? Not necessarily.

How to make a viral video

I got to thinking about this concept of virality in recent days with the viral video of the dad and professor in South Korea giving an interview over the air to the BBC network about East Asian affairs, his kids and wife stormed into his office seemingly and unknowingly sabotaged his live performance and interview that was being shown across the globe. As anyone who is a parent knows, kids have a distinct and innate ability to show up out of nowhere when the moment is least appropriate or desired for them to do so. This video, dubbed the “BBC interview hijacked by children” went viral in a matter of minutes after its’ original showing live on BBC.

What is it about this video that struck a chord with so many people around the world? Is there something we can all take away from this video that can improve our own video content and potential virality? I say unequivocally yes. And does it do anything to satisfy emotional triggers we all have deep embedded inside each one of us? No doubt about it. Here is what that video had and has that can enlighten all of us on what kind of video will potentially engage, or even delight people.

  • It’s at least mildly voyeuristic. Shows behind the scenes of life.
  • It’s humorous.
  • No script or acting of any kind.
  • It’s nostalgic. Reminds us of our current or past lives.
  • Exhibits or exposes perceived “flaws” in us, our team, or our family.
  • It’s slightly or overly chaotic.
  • Bonus: If it’s Live.
  • Bonus: If it contains either a dog, cat, or a child.
  • Lastly and maybe most importantly…It’s human and real, or a representation of life.

 

While these elements of a video certainly do not guarantee success, huge engagement, a staggering number of views, or even virality, utilizing these elements organically in your videos and video campaigns will certainly better the chances of any of them and possibly all of them happening. Just don’t script it out. Be real, be flawed and most of all be human.

Author, Eric Graham, Digital Marketing Manager- iWeSocial.com

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